The Selfie of the monkey was the subject of a legal battle for the … – lagranepoca

La Selfie de este mono fue motivo de una batalla legal por los derechos de autor
WILDLIFE PERSONALITIES/DAVID J SLATER

A british photographer wins the legal battle of the rights of the author of a “Selfie” you took a monkey on the island of Indonesia in 2011.

David Slater had 17 years photographing nature. In the year 2011, it happened a curious fact, that was the subject of a legal dispute with a macaque black.

Slater was in the jungle doing his work, when he noticed the curiosity of the monkeys, and had the ingenious idea of leaving the switch of your camera to the scope on one of them and leave.

When he returned, he discovered that the monkey had taken several photos, but only 2 of them were worth the effort and one is the “Selfie smile”.

©DAVID J SLATER

The photographer has claimed credit for the photographs and sold the license to the agency Cater News. After this, other blogs began to use these images without permission, arguing that the photo had been taken by the animal and that he was not entitled to the copyright and should be considered in the public domain.

Here the curious Naruto

In 2014, the Copyright office of the united States, concluded that “a work created by a non-human may not be subject to copyright”, giving the reason to the supporters of the public domain, said The Spanish.

But there not just everything, when in 2015, Slater decides to claim the rights of author, you are faced with PETA, an Association for the protection of the rights of animals, who claim the rights in favor of the macaque, who named it “Naruto”.

This case was called “Naruto vs David Slater,” though the identity of the monkey is also in dispute, as PETA asserts that it is a female, and Slater, who is a male.

Slater and PETA announced in a press release that the photographer will donate 25% of the income generated by the images of the organizations dedicated to the protection of well-being, or habitat of Naruto”.

Finally, the judges of a court in San Francisco, ruled in favor of Slater after two years.

The joint statement between the organization PETA and the photographer adds that this case “deals with important and innovative issues regarding the expansion of the rights of non-human animals”, according to what reported BBC.

Deja un comentario

Uso de cookies

Este sitio web utiliza cookies para que usted tenga la mejor experiencia de usuario. Si continúa navegando está dando su consentimiento para la aceptación de las mencionadas cookies y la aceptación de nuestra política de cookies, pinche el enlace para mayor información.plugin cookies

ACEPTAR
Aviso de cookies
EnglishFrançaisDeutschMagyarItalianoNorsk bokmålPortuguêsРусскийEspañolSvenska